Tuesday Treats

Our last Tuesday Treats has now been edited to show the identities of the plants on the Nature Table.  It’s here:

https://thepleasuregardener.blog/2020/08/04/tuesday-treats-18/

I thought we might change things around just a little bit for Tuesday Treats.  Still the Nature Table, of course, but it’s a different sort of Nature Table.  We’ve had a couple of weeks of tricky ones.  This one should be easier.  It’s from the allotment, so expect to see veggies!  This change, to easier challenges, won’t always last, but this week I have my Annual Review as a tutor, so I need you to show progress in your recognition skills!  :~))

The second little variation is…  If you look at the header for the blog, it says:

If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need. – Marcus Tullius Cicero

We haven’t really touched on the library part, so I thought I might share with you what I’m reading, and you might sometimes share what you’re reading.  What do you think?

I’m reading ‘The End of Everything  (Astrophysically Speaking)’.  It’s by cosmologist Katie Mack, and it’s meant for public consumption.  It explores how the Universe got started, and the different ways in which it might come to an end.  It’s very interesting.  Did you know this – we speak of the observable Universe, i.e. the bit we can see with our range of telescopes and such.  We can’t see further, not because our kit is lacking, but because the observable Universe is bounded everywhere by a wall of flame, a nuclear inferno, space on fire from the Big Bang 13.8 billion years ago.  The light from that inferno and from that long ago time is just reaching us now.  And, you can’t see through fire.  We will never see what is on the other side of that wall of flame.  How about that?

If you like a bit of science, this book is recommended.  (People who know me will know that no money was received for that recommendation.  In fact, I paid money to be able to read the book!)

Right, the Nature Table.

1  What’s in the trug?

 

Nat's 1 A

 

2  What have we got here?

 

Nat's 2 A

 

3  The veg and the flowers, please.  And why are they together?

Nat's 3 A

 

4  The flowers, please, both lots.

Nat's 4 A

 

5  The flowers in this image, and in the last, are classified into 12 different groups.  Decide which groups are represented in these two images.

Nat's 5 A

 

And that’s it!  Easy peasy.  Probably.

Good luck.

 

 

A Tale of Two…Crinums

 

Well, not really a tale, but I couldn’t resist…  I have two images of Crinum x powellii, all dressed up for a summer party.  Let’s hope there aren’t any beheadings…

 

Jo's Crinum A

I had this Crinum in a pot for a couple of years – and it did flower – but, for one reason or another I finished up with a number of pots of Crinum, so decided to take the risk and put one out into the garden.  That was three years ago, and this is the second year that it’s flowered.  For scale, the white Phlox on the left is about 4ft 6ins tall.  The foliage is remarkably free of slug damage.  Today, I counted 12 flowers and buds on the taller spike.  It’s never been as good.  And, while the central bulb is huge, now, there are a whole flock of adolescent-sized youngsters.

And, one of our gardeners has sent an image of his Crinum, which I’m sure is in a pot.

Hugh's Crinum A

It, too, looks as though there are a goodly number of buds coming up from the centre, so it’s definitely a good year for Crinums.

They don’t last for very long, but I do love something as flamboyant as this.  And it seems that pot or garden will do – at least until we get a bad winter.

 

 

Tuesday Treats

 

It’s Tuesday Treats time again.  Last week’s has now been edited, to show the answers, and it’s here:

https://wordpress.com/post/thepleasuregardener.blog/1591

Let’s see what’s on the Nature Table this week.

 

1  Edited to add:  This is Eryngium.  It’s probably E. planum, but it could be E. bourgatii.  Whichever, it’s commonly called Sea Holly, largely because it’s prickly and lives by the sea.  The thing about growing near the sea, unless you get too close, is that you tend to be growing in sand, which is extremely well drained.  That’s what it likes.

Glynis's Harlow Carr 2 3 A

 

2  Edited to add:  This isn’t easy, but we did see some on the Nature Table very recently.  It’s Veronicastrum.  This is from Harlow Carr, and I think the ones on the left are their plantings of Veronicastrum virginicum ‘Fascination’.  The main clump that we’re looking at has different coloured spikes, and I’m prepared to hazard a bet that they are Veronicastrum virginicum ‘Erica’, which opens pale pink from redder buds.

Glynis's Harlow Carr 2 4 A

 

3  Edited to add: This is Helenium.  No name was attached to the image, but I suspect, from the time of flowering, that it might be ‘Sahin’s Early Flowerer’ AGM.  The common name for Helenium is Sneezeweed because, I understand, people used to make a form of snuff from it.  People also used to make a form of coffee from acorns, when things got really bad.  Because you can, doesn’t mean you should…

Glynis's Harlow Carr 2 11 A

 

4  Edited to add: This is Russian Sage, Perovskia atriplicifolia.  Oh no, it’s not.  It’s Salvia yangii.  Who knows what Mr Perovski might think, but renaming has taken place.  However, the Royal Horticultural Society heads the data entry as Salvia yangii, but the text refers to Perovskia atriplicifolia.  Also, they’re selling it as Perovskia atriplicifolia, so the change seems to be a bit, um, half-hearted.  Whatever you call it, this is a plant that needs drainage as good as that for the Eryngium.

Glynis's Harlow Carr 2 12 A

 

5  Edited to add: Hippeastrum.  You usually buy these bulbs in a box from the supermarket, where they are inevitably called Amaryllis.  But, they are Hippeastrum, meaning ‘knight’s star’, as in a mounted rider, and the star on his horse’s forehead.  It’s a bit romantic, but who’s to argue?  Normally in flower round about Christmas, you can see from the rest of the picture that it’s flowering now this minute.

Hugh's Hippeastrum A

 

6  Edited to add:  The email said that this was some sort of mallow, rest of the name unknown.  I don’t know what it is, and wonder whether it’s one of those mallow relatives, such as Anisodontea.  But I don’t know.

Judy's IMG_1172 A

 

Good luck with these!

Edited to add:  So, how did you do?.  Whatever the result, award yourself a virtual cup of hot chocolate.  With marshmallows.

Plants Anonymous

 

Most of the plant images I’m sent by my groups of gardeners come with no indication of what the plant might be.  I recognise a lot of them (possibly because many have been swapped in class!), but not all.

Here’s one that has got me scratching my head.  It isn’t from some posh garden, but from our own gardeners’ garden, so I’m hoping he does actually know, at the end of the day, and is just teasing me.

Help?  Does anyone recognise it?

Hugh's plant 1

Failed again… ;~)

When these daily blog posts started, it was to relieve the tedium and isolation of lockdown for everyone in the classes.  Now that lockdown is easing, although that’s only by baby steps right now, it seems appropriate to revise the schedule a bit.  After today Tuesday Treats will stay, and two other days, one being Friday.  Everything else will be more… as and when…

It’s been wonderful, the way the classes have pulled together to keep the images coming.  Thanks, guys!

So, what’s the plant?