Tuesday Treats

Last week’s Tuesday Treats answers are here:

https://thepleasuregardener.blog/2020/09/08/tuesday-treats-23/

How did you do?

Hopefully, this is the last week of my long hiatus from teaching. My course starts again next week, online for the Autumn Term, provided I can get onto the last part of the training. There is some performance anxiety here…

The course is enrolling now (anyone and everyone welcome, despite the performance anxiety!), and the first week’s course materials are available to students. That gives me a bit of a teaser. The images up there for the first week’s Nature Table are the ones I would expect to use for here. Today. Hmmm.

Also, I need to consult with the students who have run a mile from the idea of an online course (the way I feel right now, I can’t blame them!) on what to do about Tuesday Treats – the course runs on a Tuesday.

So, for this week, I’m flipping things round again. This is just to keep you on your toes, you realise…

Today, we’ll have a look at a finished project we’ve seen taking shape. I present to you – The Shed! Well done to those gardeners. It looks good enough to host a cocktail party (even socially distanced!)

Isn’t that great!

:~)))

Tuesday Treats

It’s Tuesday again, and I am overflowing with images! Enough for next week, too, I think, or almost. Let’s see how many I use here.

Last week’s Tuesday Treats on Friday have been edited to show the identities of our mysteries, and you can see it here:

https://thepleasuregardener.blog/2020/09/04/please-can-it-be-tuesday-again/

So, today’s Nature Table… See what you make of these:

1 Edited to add:

Japanese anemone, Anemone x hybrida ‘Honorine Jobert’ AGM. One of the best, discovered in Verdun, France in 1858. Grows to 1.5 metres.

2 Edited to add:

Another Japanese anemone, Anemone x hybrida ‘Pretty Lady Susan’. This is part of the ‘Pretty Lady’ series, from Blooms of Bressingham via Mr. Yoshihiro Kanazawa of Japan.

3 Edited to add:

And yes, another Japanese anemone, Anemone x hybrida, an old planting, name lost in the mists of time.

4 Edited to add:

Arum italicum ssp italicum ‘Marmoratum’ AGM, late summer spike of orange-red berries. ‘Marmoratum’ means ‘marbled’, referring to the white-veined leaves.

5 Edited to add:

Lathyrus latifolius ‘Rosa Perle’ AGM. Commonly known as ‘Pink Pearl’. The only thing these lovely perennial sweet peas lack is a scent. So, grow a few scented ones through them. And yes, the flower on the right is a passionflower, Passiflora caerulea.

6 Both flowers and foliage, please.

Edited to add:

A lovely clump of Cyclamen hederifolium AGM, growing next to a Heuchera.

7 This shrub is flowering for the second time.

Edited to add:

Viburnum plicatum f. tomentosum ‘Mariesii’ AGM. Well, that was a mouthful. The gardener tells me this is a second flowering – I think that’s unusual, unless you know different?

8 Edited to add:

The beautiful blue Salvia patens AGM. The image was sent as ‘Blue Ensign’, but I can’t find any reference to that cultivar. However, many names such as ‘Oxford Blue’ swirl around the species itself.

Good luck! Get as far as you can with the name, even if it’s only the genus. Further is good, though. Answers next week.

Edited to add: So, how did you get on? Treat yourself to some virtual chocolates! Well done!

Foliage

 

I’ve got some images for you that were originally slated for last Friday, but got bumped because of the Tuesday Treats debacle.  So, let’s have a look at them now.

We’ve already seen a couple of the images that this gardener sent – the Choisya and the Fatsia, and these are also of the foliage plantings that add so much to her garden at all seasons.  See what you think.

 

 

I hope you enjoyed that little stroll down the foliage path!

Please can it be Tuesday again?

When I posted on Tuesday, I understood what I was doing. When I come to post today, WordPress have changed EVERYTHING, and I really mean EVERYTHING, and I have no clue. There’s just this blank page with no apparent controls. How do I add images? No clue.

So, there’s my whinge.

Let’s see how much of a mess I can make of this.

Hopefully, here are some plants on the Nature Table. See how many you can identify.

1 Edited to add

Rudbeckia hirta ‘Goldilocks’ – short lived half-hardy perennials that are grown as annuals in the UK. Sometimes called Gloriosa Daisies. Grown from seed sown this spring. ‘Goldilocks’ has a Fleuroselect Gold Medal.

2 Edited to add

Rudbeckia laciniata ‘Herbstsonne’ AGM. The cultivar name means ‘Autumn Sun’. This is a robust clump-forming perennial, with a long flowering period.

Here’s a closer look

3 Edited to add:

Don’t try eating this. It’s poisonous.

Aconitum napellus flowers for ages, with these gorgeous royal blue flowers. Just put it at the back of the border, and not in the salad.

4 Edited to add:

Clematis ‘Arabella’ AGM. This is a non-climbing scrambling clematis. We saw it early in the season when it started flowering, and it’s still going strong.

5 Edited to add:

Sorghum nigrum, Black Millet. An annual grass that is grown round the world as a food crop. It also deserves its place in a mixed border, and I’ll see whether we can save seed.

6 Here’s something different. I’ll tell you that the plant is a fuchsia. It’s the caterpillar I’m interested in.

Edited to add:

Yes, these are the caterpillars of the Elephant Hawk Moth, and apparently they like fuchsias. The adult is spectacular. Look it up.

Here’s another one

I’m going to quit there while I’m nearly ahead.

Next week, Tuesday Treats will be back on Tuesday as normal, and with some of the lovely images that have come in following my plea!

Good luck with these!

Edited to add: So, how did you get on? Treat yourself to a lovely chocolate biscuit.

Tuesday Treats

It’s Tuesday Treats time again, and I have a small problem.  Before I get into that, last week’s Tuesday Treats has been edited to show the identities of the plants.  It’s here:

https://thepleasuregardener.blog/2020/08/25/tuesday-treats-21/

So, the problem for today…  I’m certain that I had more images picked out for today, but I can’t find them.  No, they aren’t accidentally deleted – I checked.  I do seem to have a large cluster of unread emails from a few weeks back, and I wonder whether they’re in among those, but it’s midnight, and too late to sensibly go hunting in my bulging in-box.

So, just for this week, we’re going to have a look at someone’s garden today, and we’ll have the Nature Table on Friday.  Provided I can find some plants to put on it…

All the following came from one of our gardeners, and are images of her lovely garden in August.

Glynis's Garden August 2 A

 

Glynis's Garden August 3 A

 

Glynis's Garden August 4 A

 

Glynis's Garden August 5 A

 

Glynis's garden August A

Super!

Thanks for sharing.

Divide and Conquer

 

One of our gardeners had a rather crowded Hosta ‘Blue Mouse Ears’.  So, a couple of weeks ago, here’s what happened:

1   Yes, a bit crowded…

Glynis Hosta Mouse Ears 1 A

 

2  No sign of vine weevil, at least.  Good root systems here…

Glynis Hosta Mouse Ears 2 A

 

3   Plants for free!

Glynis Hosta Mouse Ears 3 A

 

Good job well done, there.  Even better, it’s pretty much not stopped raining since that clump was split up, which will help the divisions settle in to their new circumstances.

Tuesday Treats

It’s time for us to guess our way round the plant world again!

Last week’s Tuesday Treats has been updated to show identities, and can be seen here:

https://thepleasuregardener.blog/2020/08/18/tuesday-treats-20/

Well done if you got all those.

Here we have this week’s bouquet…

1  Edited to add:

Hemerocallis ‘Sammy Russell’.  This was introduced in 1951 by Hugh Russell, one of the most influential American daylily breeders of the 20th century.  It starts flowering early, and continues after most other Hemerocallis have finished.

Jo's Hemerocallis Sammy Russell

 

2  Also, do you know which group within its type this belongs to?

Edited to add:  This is Dahlia ‘Mary Evelyn’, and is a collerette dahlia.

Jo's Dahlia Mary Evelyn

 

3  And again, what is it, and which group within its type does this belong to?

Edited to add:

This is Clematis ‘Princess Kate’.  It is a Group 3 clematis for pruning, and is in the texensis group – these clematis have lovely bell-like flowers.

Meg's Clematis Princess Kate A

 

4  Recognise it?  Surprised?  I saw this flowering a week ago.

Edited to add:

Yes, this is a Hellebore, a double flowered Helleborus x hybridus, which would have flowered in Spring, but is now in flower again.  I can only assume that the hot weather in April and May, followed by a period of hard frosts in early June, made this plant think that it had gone through 4 seasons, and it’s now Spring again.

Hugh's hellebore A

 

5  The yellow thing.  But have a go at the others if you can.

Edited to add:

Choisya ternata, the Mexican Orange Blossom.  I don’t have the cultivar name, but it’s probably ‘Sundance’.

With it, we have Trachelospermum jasminoides (the climber), and Cotoneaster horizontalis under the Choisya.

Meg's foliage 6 A

 

6  Edited to add:

Fatsia japonica AGM.

Meg's foliage 10 A

 

7  The orange thing.

Edited to add:  No-one got this right.  It’s Agastache aurantiaca ‘Apricot Sprite’ with lovely mint-scented foliage.  I grew it from seed this year, and like all the seeds I grew, it suffered from the uneven weather, but it’s come good, although it should be a bit taller.

It’s sold as an annual, but is a tender perennial.  Well, there’s a challenge.  I haven’t got any seed left, so I wonder whether I can overwinter the plants in the greenhouse?  Can’t hurt to try…

Jo's Lavatera and Agastache

 

8  This is from the Dorothy Clive Garden

Edited to add:

This is Bougainvillea.  I’ve no idea which sort, so I defer to anyone who does!

Hugh's Dorothy Clive Garden (66)

 

9  Edited to add:

This is a Monarda.  Its owner has put in the comments that it’s Monarda ‘Kardinal’, and she should know…

Glynis's Monarda A

 

Good luck!

So, how did you do?  Have a chocolate digestive if you got any of them right.

Well done!

The Carpentry Project

 

I’m a little later than usual again today.  Isn’t it amazing how life just gets in the way?

You might remember a carpentry project from one of our gardeners over the lockdown period.  Well, that gardener sent me a few images of his garden, plus the finished project.  A couple of the images I used in Tuesday treats, but here’s the other, plus the project.  It’s very impressive.

Look at the colour in that gladiolus…

Rob's 1 A

 

Lovely cannas, flowering well.  And look – is that tea for two laid out in the summerhouse?  He tells us it’s just a garden shed, but it looks much grander than that!

 

Rob's 4 A

Perhaps we’ll see the whole thing another time!

Great work there, and the garden is looking super.

Tuesday Treats

A little late today, but it’s time for Tuesday Treats.

Last week’s post has been edited to show identities, and can be found here:

https://thepleasuregardener.blog/2020/08/11/tuesday-treats-19/

So, what do we have today?  Let’s see…

1   Edited to add:

This is the white version of Tigridia pavonia (the name, roughly, means Tiger Peacock).  These tender bulbs are not grown as much as perhaps they should be – they sell at about 10p each, so not a big investment.  These are a bit short because of the drought we’ve had – they’re about 2 ft tall.  Tigridia can get to 3-4 ft, , so quite impressive.  They are members of the Iris family, with several flowers per stem.  They come in red, yellow, pink or white.

Jo's Tigridia

 

2   Edited to add:

These are Begonia semperflorens, or the wax begonia.  They are grown here as annual bedding plants, but are tender perennials.  They root from cuttings very easily, and once the weather turns in autumn, they can be dug up, potted up, and will give months more of colour either in the greenhouse or on a windowsill.  I’m a particular fan of dark-leaved cultivars like these.

Glynis's Begonia A

 

3   Edited to add:

Agapanthus.  The photo’s owner didn’t say which sort.  I’m guessing they came in a big bag from the supermarket…

Rob's 2 A

 

4  As many of the things as you can name

Edited to add:   The main subject is the Aeonium arboreum.  The red leaves peering over the wall are Persicaria ‘Red Dragon’.  The trough contains sedums, sempervivums and echeveria.  The grassy plant in the pot is not a grass, but a member of the Lily family.  It’s Ophiopogon planiscapus.  Some are the species’ green, others are the black of ‘Nigricans’.  The lovely thing about Ophiopogon is that, if you save the seed from ‘Nigricans’, the seedlings exhibit almost perfect Mendelian inheritance ratios for green or black colour.  Try it.

Glynis's Aeoniums plus A

 

5  The yellow things

Edited to add:  The yellow thing is Rudbeckia ‘Goldsturm’.  With it is a rose, agapanthus, eleagnus and what looks like a Ribes, identity unknown.  Oh, I wonder whether it’s a hardy hibiscus…  Not sure.

Rob's 3 A

 

6   Edited to add:

White Cosmos ‘Psyche White’ and Lavatera ‘Mont Blanc’, with Dahlia Bishop of ‘Llandaff’ in the background.  But the main event is the orange Canna ‘Durban’.  There’s a long story of litigation over Plant Breeder’s Rights on this, which I will share if anyone is interested.  But it shines a light on the South African Appeal Court, for whom much paperwork was prepared.  However, the judge was only interested in what must have been about the first line, identifying the owner of the Plant Breeder’s Rights as someone who ‘discovered’ the plant in a garden in Durban.  No, no, no, said the judge.  You can’t discover something growing in someone else’s garden, because it is already known.  Appeal upheld!  Don’t you love judges with minds like a bacon slicer?

Jo's Canna Durban

 

7  Edited to add:  The real plant is a richer, deeper red than this – a red that my camera doesn’t handle very well.  This is Crocosmia ‘Hellfire’, and is a gorgeous plant, far better than ‘Lucifer’, with huge flowers.

Jo's Crocosmia Hellfire

 

8  Edited to add:  My apologies.  I wasn’t specific enough, I think.  Yes, there are Cosmos in the picture – the varying shades of Cosmos ‘Rubenza’.  But the main event is the Salpiglossis ‘Black Trumpets’.  I used to grow Salpiglossis years ago, and they were just over a couple of feet in height.  Things seem to have changed, and these are about 10 inches.  But, they have been very good, and I’m pleased with them.

Jo's Salpiglossis

 

Good luck!

 

Edited to add:  So, how did you do?  Treat yourself to a virtual chocolate if you got any right.  Well done!

 

A Garden View

 

It’s always nice to see other people’s gardens, and for the last few months, we haven’t had a chance to do that.  Except, of course, here in this blog.  Today, we’ve got some lovely pictures from a new contributor, with lots of interest and colour, and making the most of every inch.  Let’s have a wander…

 

Maxine 1 A

 

Maxine 2 A

 

Maxine 3 A

 

Maxine 4 A

 

Thanks for sharing!