Six on Saturday

A mixed bag this week, some from the students and some from me.

1  The first is from one of the students.  She moved to this house only recently, and has done a lot of work in the garden.  Here it is:

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2  The second image is from another student, a picture of some gorgeous ferns unfurling themselves in the gardens of Mount Grace Priory:

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That’s my store of images from the gardening groups exhausted, so the rest of this Saturday’s pick are from my garden.

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3  This is Siberian Iris ‘Pink Parfait’.  This is its first time of flowering, and I love it.

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4  Another one flowering for the first time – Oriental Poppy ‘Harlem’.  Must remember to stake it next year – it’s giving the neighbouring penstemon a hard time.

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5  A beautiful, fragrant peony next to Nepeta ‘Six Hills Giant’.  The peony was a gift, and the giver thought it might be ‘Sarah Bernhardt’.

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6  And finally, a problem.  Last week I posted a picture of one of the big fat buds of Oriental Poppy ‘Snow Goose’.  This is what happened when that bud opened.  Also, there are long, dark brown streaks on the stem, underneath the base of each leaf.  As the other buds start to open, there is some brown staining on the petal edges, but not as bad as this.  One of my students, with a similar problem, consulted the RHS, who diagnosed it as Pedicel Necrosis.  Any information, anyone?  I’m tempted to dig it up and throw it away, but the stems are strong and the flowers are enormous.  They would be very beautiful without this problem.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Six on Saturday

Another week, another Saturday…

We’ve had some rain, which has helped all this bosky new growth.  The orchard is exciting.  It’s gone from a neatly mown expanse of green, with blue pools of forget-me-nots to a jungle that needs to be explored with elephant guns and tiger traps.  Oh well, the insects will love it.

My six for this week are a little on the wild side – well, some of them are.

1  Ragged Robin, or Lychnis flos-cuculi.

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I have Lychnis ‘Petite Jenny’ in the border, a dwarf, very double version of Ragged Robin.  Because it’s so double, it’s sterile and doesn’t produce seed.  Um.  This plant popped up a couple of feet from ‘Petite Jenny’, so I don’t think its mum has read the books.

2  Fringed campion, or Silene fimbriata

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This was given to me by one of my students.  It has an amazing capacity to thrive in deep, dark, dry shade.

3  Siberian Iris ‘Rikugi-Sakura’

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I got this last autumn for my new border, so I was pleased to see a flowering stem already.

4  How about them apples?

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A very muscular bud, one of several, on another new plant last autumn, Oriental Poppy ‘Snow Goose’.  I can’t wait to see the flower when it opens.

5  Heuchera ‘Pinot Gris’ underneath Hydrangea ‘Sabrina’

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The hydrangea languished in a pot for a couple of years, surviving an attack by the dreaded vine weevil, but it’s recovering at last.  The heuchera has really good variable colour all year.

6a  Before

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When they start to go pink, you know that your Viburnum opulus ‘Roseum’ is going to finish up like this:

6b  After

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Someone said what good confetti it would make, and I can’t but agree.

There’s my six for this week.  If you want to join in (and why wouldn’t you?) go here and check it out:

https://thepropagatorblog.wordpress.com/

 

 

 

What the Gardening students did next

Here’s another set of contributions from my students.  They’re really getting the hang of this now.  :~))

The first gardener sent this picture of a visit to the Japanese Kyoto garden at Holland Park.  Beautiful.

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He also sent me a picture of his favourite rhododendron.  It’s about 25 feet tall, and full of flowers.

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Our second gardener sent a picture of a lovely white broom in her garden that can’t fail to please.

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The rest of these images are from our third gardener, showcasing a few of her lovely plants.

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This is the striking Heuchera ‘Marmalade’, in front of a pretty Iris.

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Here’s what I’ve always called Smilacina racemosa, or False Spikenard, but is now called Maianthemum racemosum.  Whatever you call it, the fragrance is something not to be missed.

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This is a pretty self-sown seedling from the long-spurred Aquilegia ‘Yellow Star’.

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And finally, a biennial that isn’t seen often enough.  Like a good German wine, you just keep adding bits onto the name, until you get to Lunaria annua alba ‘Variegata’.  It’s white variegated Honesty to you and me.  It starts off a rather drab green, but in early spring, the new foliage is strikingly variegated with pure white, emphasising the white flowers.  And then the seed pods turn into those silvery, papery, moon-shaped discs.  I love it, but so do the rabbits, so I’ll enjoy hers, instead.

I still have some of their images left to show, but tomorrow it’s my turn for Six on Saturday.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What the Gardening students did

I said yesterday that I would post some of the pictures sent to me by my students.  These are from 3 of them.  There will be more tomorrow.

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Gorgeous!  The laburnum is much tidier than mine.  And what a lovely show of Nectaroscordum (the hanging bells at upper right).

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You can tell that the gardener here is also an artist.

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A lovely image from another gardener, with rhododendrons, laburnum and, if I remember rightly, the clematis is Nelly Moser.

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And from a third gardener, this is Weigela ‘Florida Variegata’ AGM, showing off in front of a pretty blue fence.  The next picture is hers, too.

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An alien invader, waiting for the gate to be opened…

We’ll see what else they’ve been up to tomorrow.

 

 

 

Trees and shrubs

So many things are happening now, in the garden, but some of the most spectacular are the spring trees and shrubs.  Here is a small selection of what is currently giving me pleasure.

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Good old-fashioned Laburnum.  This tree is currently home to a family of blue tits.  When I get home, it’s a real pleasure to sit in the car for a few minutes and watch the parents bringing in fat caterpillars for the babies.

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Fabulous every year is the Viburnum opulus ‘Roseum’, or Snowball Bush.  Behind is the white lilac with a fragrance that fills this part of the garden.  And underneath is an enormous pile of wood chippings, from my neighbour’s pollarded weeping willow, and that’s going to be just what I need this autumn.

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Still looking for a home is this Hulthemia rose, ‘For Your Eyes Only’.  It’s doing well, considering that it’s in a pot.

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Also still looking for a home, and still in a pot is a second Hulthemia rose, ‘Eyes For You’.

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I really thought I’d lost this over the winter, and this first pair of flowers made me smile.  It’s Salvia ‘Royal Bumble’.

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The last flower on the tree peony, flanked by Persicaria ‘Red Dragon’ on the right, and on the left the purple gromwell, which Kew calls Lithospermum purpureocaeruleum, and the RHS calls Buglossoides purpurocaerulea, and I call pretty.

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It ought to be a shrub!  In front of the ash tree is this ornamental rhubarb, Rheum palmatum.  It’s next to the cess pool and seems to be thriving.

Tomorrow I’ll have a look at what’s going on in the gardening groups’ gardens.  They’ve sent me loads of pictures!

 

 

Six on Saturday

Last week, I asked my gardening groups if they would like to have the Six on Saturday slot that week.  There was enthusiasm, but a distinct lack of photos.  However, cometh another week, cometh the deluge, and I’m now spoilt for choice.  This is all their own work.

1  Trachycarpus fortunei.

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It’s in the corner of the garden, and is now about 10 feet high.  Wowsa!

2  Oyster (I think) mushrooms.

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From the same gardener as the Trachycarpus.  She left the box on her kitchen table overnight, and look what happened the next morning!  Wowsa, again!

3  From a visit to Chapel-en-le-Frith, so it’s A garden, if not THE garden.  This gardener sent me a load of images from this visit, and it was very difficult to choose.

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The garden is Higher Crossings, open under the Open Gardens Scheme, and is in the High Peak of the Derbyshire Peak District, which is making a spectacular background.

4  Another one from Higher Crossings.

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It is, of course, rhododendron time.

4  Higher Crossings again.

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The super shade lover Spotty Dotty, or Podophyllum versipelle ‘Spotty Dotty’, to be precise.

5  A fourth one from Higher Crossings.

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Another lovely image of this garden.  I think that must be Euphorbia griffithii ‘Fireglow’ in the foreground.  And what a spectacular Rhododendron.

6  This one was sent as evidence!

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We’re sowing herb seeds this term, and it has to be said that there have been some catastrophes.  ‘Death by…’ (insert method of choice) seems to be the watch word of the day.  This gardener is off on a week’s holiday, and she has sent this as evidence that the Cinnamon Basil was definitely growing.  Don’t they look good?

So, these were my choices for Six on Saturday from those submitted.  I could easily have made it 16 on Saturday…

If you like the idea of Six on Saturday, visit the guy who started it all, at https://thepropagatorblog.wordpress.com/

All the rules are there if you want to join in.  If not, read the comments on each entry, and follow the links there to other Sixes on Saturday.

 

 

Six on Saturday

Having been inspired by the meme Six on Saturday, I’d better get on and do mine, I think.  Here goes.  It’s Tulip Time.  Oh, and because I have absolutely no self-control in these matters, there are seven for this Six on Saturday.  Don’t hate me…

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Tulip Charming Lady.  And charming it definitely is.  New to me this year, and I’ll be growing it again.

 

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Tulip Brownie.  This is the second year I’ve grown Brownie, and it’s a gorgeous little tryer, never discomposed by the weather.

 

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Tulip Danceline.  Another one that’s new to me this year.

 

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Tulip Silk Road. Again, new this year.  And it has a lovely fragrance.

 

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Tulip Dream Touch.  Another lovely one, and so far immune to wind and rain.

 

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Tulip Huis Ten Bosch.  Another new one.  Do I like it?  Not sure yet, but it’s definitely different.

My seventh pick is a mistake I made.  Last November, I sorted out the previous spring’s tulip bulbs into those that would flower again, and those that were too small to flower.  There were a lot that were too small.  So, what to do with them?  Give them the chance to grow on for next year?  Or compost them?  In the end, they went in to a new bed that had been sheeted over for a season, but as yet didn’t have a planting plan.  They were just planted in rows, with no finesse.  I expected a lot of leaf, and maybe the odd flower.  This was what I got:

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Amazing.

I wonder where I’m going to put them all when it comes back round to planting time?

Six on Saturday as a meme was started here:

https://thepropagatorblog.wordpress.com/

I blame him.  :~))